Crochet Dishcloth Tutorial

DISHCLOTH PATTERN TUTORIAL

This tutorial is for a really simple dishcloth, using a waffle pattern.

You will need:

Cotton yarn (I used King Cole Cottonsoft)
Hook – 3.50mm
Needle
Scissors

Stitches:

Chain (ch)
Treble (tr)
Front Post Treble Crochet (FPtr)

Front Post treble crochet sounds more complicated than it is – you are still working a normal treble crochet, but instead of working it into the top of a stitch, you are working it around the post of a stitch (which makes the post of the stitch you are working around stand out to the front – hence the name).

I have been testing out the finished product in my own kitchen, using the same two cloths on a rotation for over 5 months, and they have not deteriorated or fallen apart despite constant use. They can also go in the washing machine on 40 or 60 degrees and can withstand the hot setting in the tumble dryer too.

You can make the dishcloth any size you like as long as your starting chain is a multiple of 3 plus 2.

I like to start with a chain of 41 (39 + 2)

So…

Chain 41.

Row 1

In 3rd chain from hook work 1 treble crochet (tr) (I work through one loop of the chain rather than both -it’s much easier)

And then work 1 tr into each stitch along. (You should have 39 stitches plus the chain 2 at the beginning).
Ch1, turn.

Row 2

1tr into 1st stitch.


FPtr around the next stitch

So, yarn over and the put your hook behind the stitch, like this:

Then yarn over again and pull your hook back to the front, and finish off the stitch (yarn over, pull through 2 loops, yarn over and pull through 2 loops). And it should look like this:

And then you need to work 1 tr into the next 2 stitches, the first stitch might be hiding behind your FPtr, so double check youve got the first one.

Once you’ve done your 2 treble crochets, you need to work another FPtr around the next stitch, and then just repeat the pattern –
1 tr, 1 tr, 1FPtr, 1 tr, 1 tr…

And it should start to look like this – you can see the FPtr standing out:

Carry on working 2 tr in between each FPtr, until you have 2 stitches left, and then work 1 FPtr around the next stitch and then 1 tr into the final stitch.

Chain 1, turn.

Row 3

1tr into first 2 stitches, then FPtr around next two stitches – you should be able to see where the FPtr need to go because these stitches will be more visible than the other ones. Here you can see I’ve worked 1tr, 1tr, then FPtr around the next 2 stitches.

So this row is slightly different to the previous row – you are working FPtr, FPtr, 1tr, FPtr, FPtr, and so on. Repeat this pattern until you have 2 stitches remaining work 1tr into each of those stitches.

Chain 1, turn.

Row 4 – 20 (or however many rows you want to do!)

Repeat rows 2 & 3 until your cloth is the desired size. It’s usually best to end up on a row 2.

Now that the waffle texture is starting to form, you should be able to identify where you need to work the FPtr each time because these stitches are really starting to stand out.

After you have finished row 4, your work should start to look like this, and the back looks slightly different.

At first your work might look a bit wobbly, but as you build up the rows it should neaten out. And you should have a nice little border each side to make it look even.

Once your cloth has reached the desired size, fasten off and weave in ends. Your dishcloth is now ready to use.

Pattern

Chain 41

Row 1

1tr in 3rd chain from hook, and 1tr into each stitch along (39 trebles plus chain)
Chain 1, turn

Row 2

1tr, (FPtr, 1tr, 1tr) x 12, FPtr, 1tr
Chain 1, turn.

Row 3

1tr, 1tr, (FPtr, FPtr, 1tr) x 12, 1 tr
Chain 1, turn.

Row 4 – 20

Repeat rows 2 & 3 until you reach desired size.

Fasten off, weave in ends.

I think this is a link to download the PDF – try it!

https://www.ravelry.com/dls/hookandmarvellous/445958?filename=DishclothPDF.pdf

Easy Crochet Heart

I’ve been wanting to create my own heart pattern for ages, but never thought I could.  Anyway, I found a really easy pattern for a small heart, which is here on Ravelry by a lady known as Crochet Leaf –

https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/basic-crochet-heart

And it was lovely, so quick to make and looks like this:

 

 

However, I wanted a bigger more chunky heart, so I decided to attempt my own pattern, and the result was this:

So if you like the look of that, please read on!

For this pattern you can use any size hook or yarn, but I found that a smaller hook than you would normally use for a particular weight of yarn makes a more compact finished product, with less gaps in your work (I don’t like gaps).

Firstly I will write a photo tutorial, then the basic pattern will be at the bottom of this page (in UK and US terms).

I am going to write the pattern in UK terms, because I’m from the UK!  But I am used to using US terms, so if anything doesn’t make sense, please let me know because I may have made an accidental mistake somewhere.

Stitches Used are

Magic ring

Chain (ch)

Half Treble Crochet (htr)

Treble Crochet (tr)

Double Treble Crochet (dtr)

Slip Stitch (ss)

 

Tutorial

Start with a magic ring. If you don’t know how to do a magic ring there is a handy video here:

 

So, magic ring

Chain 2 (does not count as a stitch)

Round 1

For the first round you are just going to work 12 treble crochets (tr) into the ring, and pull it tight.  Then slip stitch to the first treble to join and make the circle complete.

Here you can see my first round before I’ve slip stitched to close it – sometimes it is easier to use a stitch marker so you know which stitch you should be joining to.

And there is the first round complete.

Round 2

The second round is an increasing round, so you first need to chain up 1 (does not count as a stitch – I should just point out here that I don’t like using chains to replace stitches, so with a simple chain 1 it just gives you a little bit more leverage to work an actual treble crochet into the first stitch, instead of chaining 2 to replace the treble).

So…

Chain 1, then work 2 treble crochets into that same stitch, and into each stitch around.

Here you can see my first 2 clusters of trebles.

At the end you should have 24 treble crochets (12 clusters of 2)

Join with a SS to the first treble of the round.

Round 3

This is the final round (WOW already)

Chain 2 and work 1 treble crochet into that same stitch.

Into the next stitch you are going to work 3 double treble crochets (dtr). And the same into the next stitch.

Then in the following stitch you are going to work 2 dtr.

Now you can see the bump of the heart beginning to take shape.

In the next stitch work 3 tr.

In the next work 1 tr and 1 htr (both in the same stitch).

In the next 5 stitches work 1 htr.

Now you are at the bottom of the heart, so in the next stitch work 1 tr and 1 dtr.

And in the following stitch work 1 dtr and 1 tr.

It should look like this so far.

So now we are going to go back up the other side of the heart, so you are basically doing the above but in reverse.

First work 1 htr into the next 5 stitches.

Then in the next stitch work 1 htr and 1 tr.

Then 3 tr into the next.

Then 2 dtr into the next, 3 dtr into the next and 3 dtr into the next.

You now should have 1 stitch left, and into this you can work 1 treble crochet.

Now you need to chain up 2 and slip stitch this chain into the bottom of that same stitch to join and finish off.

Then fasten off, and weave in ends.  I have found that sometimes that final stitch can look a bit messy, like this:

So if you make sure that when you weave in the ends you tighten it all up and just generally try and close any gaps – it improves the overall appearance of the finished heart.

Your complete heart should look like this:

These look good in any size or colour, see my variations below.

Follow this link here for a quick tutorial on how to edge these hearts and turn them into coasters or hanging decorations

http://hookandmarvellous.com/heart-coaster/

 

If you don’t need the photo tutorial above, here is the basic pattern for the heart.

 

Easy Crochet Heart Pattern (UK Version)

Magic ring, Ch 2

Round 1

12 tr into ring.

SS to 1st tr to join.

Round 2

Ch 1

2 tr into each stitch around (24 tr)

SS to 1st tr to join.

Round 3

Ch 2

1 tr into same stitch

3 dtr, 3 dtr, 2 dtr, 3 tr, (1tr, 1htr), 1 htr, 1 htr, 1 htr, 1 htr, 1 htr, (1 tr, 1 dtr), (1 dtr, 1 tr), 1 htr, 1 htr, 1 htr, 1 htr, 1 htr, (1 htr, 1 tr), 3 tr, 2 dtr, 3 dtr, 3 dtr

1 tr into final stitch, Ch 2 and slip stitch into same stitch to finish off.

Fasten off, weave in ends.

 

*****************************************

Easy Crochet Heart Pattern (US Version)

Magic ring, Ch 2

Round 1

12 dc into ring.

SS to 1st dc to join.

Round 2

Ch 1

2 dc into each stitch around (24 dc)

SS to 1st dc to join.

Round 3

Ch 2

1 dc into same stitch

3 tr, 3 tr, 2 tr, 3 dc, (1dc, 1hdc), 1 hdc, 1 hdc, 1 hdc, 1 hdc, 1 hdc, (1 dc, 1 tr), (1 tr, 1 dc), 1 hdc, 1 hdc, 1 hdc, 1 hdc, 1 hdc, (1 hdc, 1 dc), 3 dc, 2 tr, 3 tr, 3 tr

1 tr into final stitch, Ch 2 and slip stitch into same stitch to finish off.

Fasten off, weave in ends.

 

 

Easy Santa Hat (same as slouchy hat but with extra rows)

Slouchy Santa Hat – Kids age 8 to Adult

 

 

The pattern for the Santa hat is much the same as the slouchy hat  but with extra rows to create the pixie hat type effect – and of course you will need red and white yarn!

I used Boyes Great Value Double Knitting, which is just over £2 a ball – and I used less than a full ball of red, and only a small amount of the white – so it’s very budget friendly.

***IF YOU NEED DETAILED INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE STITCHES AND A PHOTO TUTORIAL I SUGGEST YOU LOOK AT THE SLOUCHY HAT PATTERN FIRST, WHICH CAN BE FOUND HERE***

http://hookandmarvellous.com/slouchy-ribbed-hat-pattern-2-sizes/ 

This pattern is written in UK Terms and the stitches used are as follows

Chain, Slip Stitch, Double Crochet, Treble Crochet, Front Post Treble Crochet (explained in Slouchy Hat Tutorial – link above)

So, here we go…

Using hook size 5.00mm and RED YARN.

Make a Magic Ring
Chain 2

Round 1

15 treble crochet into ring
Slip Stitch into 1st stitch to join.

Round 2

Ch 1
15 FPtr
SS to join

Round 3 – 6

Ch 1
FPtr, tr, Fptr, tr – repeat all the way around
SS to join

Round 7

Ch 1
FPtr, tr, tr, FPtr, tr, tr…repeat all the way around
SS to join

Round 8 – 15

Ch 1
FPtr, 2 tr into space between trebles of previous round, FPtr, 2tr…repeat all the way around
SS to join

Round 16

Ch 1
FPtr, 3 tr (into space between 2 trebles of previous round), FPtr, 3 tr…repeat all the way around
SS to join

Round 17

Ch 1
FPtr, 2 tr into 1st space in between trebles, 1 tr into 2nd space in between trebles, FPtr, 2 tr, 1tr…repeat all the way around
SS to join

Round 18

Ch 1
FPtr, 1 tr, 2tr, FPtr, 1 tr, 2 tr…repeat all the way around.
SS to join

Round 19

Repeat Round 17

Round 20

Repeat Round 18

Round 21

Repeat Round 17

Round 22

Repeat Round 18

Round 23 – 31

Ch 1
FPtr, 2 tr (in between 1st 2 trebles of previous round), 2 tr (in between 2nd 2 trebles of previous round), FPtr, 2tr, 2tr…repeat all the way around
SS to join

Round 32 – CHANGE HOOK TO 4.00MM and change to white yarn.

Ch 1
1 dc into each stitch around
SS to join

Round 33

Ch 1
1 tr all the way around
SS to join

Round 34 – 36 (you can add more rows here if you want a wider brim)

Ch 1, FPtr, 1 tr into top of next stitch, FPtr, 1 tr into top of next stitch…repeat all the way around.

Round 37 

Ch 1, 1 dc into each stitch around, join with SS.

 

Fasten off, weave in ends – attach a MASSIVE WHITE pompom if required.

And there you have it – a crochet santa hat.

Winter Hats

I have just added two adult winter hats to my Etsy Shop, they can be found here:

https://www.etsy.com/uk/listing/570525241/adult-winter-hat

 

 

I think you’ll agree they look fabulous.  The pattern worked up really quickly – it’s called the shell pattern I think!  I found a wonderful tutorial on YouTube.  The pom pom was not included in the pattern, but what’s a hat without a pom pom?!

 

Crochet Star Bauble Decoration – Pattern and Tutorial

**PLEASE NOTE THIS IS IN UK CROCHET TERMS**

 

I’ve just made myself a really pretty little star bauble, so wanted to share the pattern and tutorial.

 

For this decoration I used a DK yarn and a 3.00mm crochet hook.  But you can use any yarn and any size hook you like – it just depends on what size you want to end up with.

You will need two colours of yarn, and a stitch marker (very important!)

The stitches I used were double crochet and they are worked in a continuous round, 11 rounds in total.

The work is crocheted around a 20cm (circumference) existing Christmas Bauble.

Please note, once you are onto using both yarns – please untangle after each round, otherwise you will end up in a complete tangled mess!

Tutorial

Blue yarn

Chain 4

Slip Stitch into first chain to form a ring.

Round 1

Chain 1, 10dc into ring.

Here you can see I’ve done a couple of double crochets into the ring (where my needle is pointing) and I’ve also used a stitch marker to mark my very first stitch – this is very important so you don’t lose your way or do too many stitches in each round.

This shows I have done 10 dc into the ring and now I am up to my stitch marker, ready for the next round.  So remove the marker to start round 2.

Round 2

You need to work 2 double crochet into each stitch of round 1. Below you can see I have worked a couple of double crochets into the first stitch, and I have replaced my stitch marker.

At the end of the round you should have 20 double crochets – please count to make sure. It should look something like this.

Now you are ready to start round 3.

Round 3

Remove your stitch marker and crochet 2 double crochets into the first stitch.

Replace your stitch marker, and crochet 1 double crochet into the next stitch, then 2 double crochet into the next stitch, and 1 double crochet into the next stitch.  Carry on like this until you are back to your stitch marker.

You should have 30 double crochet – count to make sure!

The next round involves adding your next colour, so it could get complicated – but it really is quite simple, as long as you don’t get your yarn tangled.

Round 4

You are now going to add in the pink yarn (DO NOT fasten off your blue yarn)

Pull through a loop of the pink yarn and work 1dc into the first stitch.

Replace stitch marker.

Then back to your blue yarn, work 1dc into the next 5 stitches.

If you think about it, the complete round is a total of 30 double crochet – and I have split it into 5 blocks of 6. So you are working 1 pink and 5 blue double crochets, in 5 sections, and this is the beginning of creating the points of the star.

So the pattern should look something like this

Pink 1dc, Blue 1dc 1dc 1dc 1dc 1dc, Pink 1dc, Blue 1dc 1dc 1dc 1dc 1dc, Pink 1dc, Blue 1dc 1dc 1dc 1dc 1dc, Pink 1dc, Blue 1dc 1dc 1dc 1dc 1dc, Pink 1dc, Blue 1dc 1dc 1dc 1dc 1dc.

Don’t forget your stitch marker!

Round 5

If you find your yarn starts to tangle at the end of each round, please make sure you untangle it as you go along, otherwise you will get yourself into a right pickle.

So this round, we are increasing the pink by 1 stitch, and decreasing the blue by one stitch.

So you need to work 2 pink double crochets, and 4 blue double crochets – and repeat this pattern 5 times.

(Pink 1dc 1dc, Blue 1dc 1dc 1dc 1dc) (repeat 5 times)

Stitch marker!

Round 6

Work 3 pink double crochets and 3 blue double crochets.

(Pink 1dc 1dc 1dc, Blue 1dc 1dc 1dc) (repeat 5 times)

You can now see the shape of the star starting to form.

Remember to untangle your yarn, and remember to replace your stitch marker.

Each round should still have 30 double crochet.

Round 7

Work 4 pink double crochet and 2 blue double crochets – repeat 5 times.

Round 8

Work 5 pink double crochet and 1 blue double crochet (repeat 5 times)

Round 9 – 11

You have now finished your star shape and can fasten off the blue (at last – no more tangles!)

Now you just need to crochet 3 rounds of double crochet.  So basically, 1 double crochet into each stitch for the next 3 rounds.

Slip stitch to first stitch of last round – fasten off both yarns and weave in ends.

The inside of your work will probably look like this, but that’s okay because nobody sees the inside.

 

Repeat for the other half of the bauble, leaving a long tail for sewing together.

Here are my two halves waiting to go onto the bauble.

If it looks like they are a bit small, don’t worry, crochet can stretch and this will ensure it has a nice snug fit around the bauble.

So take your needle and just run a stitch through the top loops of the work and it will make a nice neat join.

Once you get all the way around, ensure you over stitch a little bit and weave the end in so that it is secure.

 

And there you are, your finished star bauble.

 

Pattern.

Blue Yarn

Chain 4.

Join with a slip stitch to form a ring

Round 1

Ch1, 10dc into ring

Round 2

2dc into each stitch around (20dc)

Round 3

2dc, 1dc, 2dc, 1dc (repeat) (30dc)

Round 4

Join pink yarn (do not fasten off blue yarn)

Pink 1dc, Blue 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, Pink 1dc, Blue 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, Pink 1dc, Blue 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, Pink 1dc, Blue 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, Pink 1dc, Blue 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, 1dc.

Round 5

Pink 1dc, 1dc, Blue 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, 1dc,Pink 1dc, 1dc, Blue 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, Pink 1dc, 1dc, Blue 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, Pink 1dc, 1dc, Blue 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, Pink 1dc, 1dc, Blue 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, 1dc.

Round 6

Pink 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, Blue 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, Pink 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, Blue 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, Pink 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, Blue 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, Pink 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, Blue 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, Pink 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, Blue 1dc, 1dc, 1dc.

Round 7

Pink 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, Blue 1dc, 1dc, Pink 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, Blue 1dc, 1dc, Pink 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, Blue 1dc, 1dc, Pink 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, Blue 1dc, 1dc, Pink 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, Blue 1dc, 1dc.

Round 8

Pink 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, Blue 1dc,  Pink 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, Blue 1dc, Pink 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, Blue 1dc, Pink 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, Blue 1dc, Pink 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, 1dc, Blue 1dc.

Fasten off blue yarn.

Rounds 9 – 11

Pink 1dc 30 times.

Fasten off pink, sew in ends.

Repeat for other half, leaving a long tail for sewing together.

Sew over bauble.

Here is a link to a pattern of the more complex version of this decoration, available to buy on Ravelry for just 60p

https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/three-colour-star-bauble

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Easy Bunting Tutorial

I love making Bunting!  So thought I would share with you a quick tutorial on how to make something as pretty as this:

First of all you will need to buy some fabric – I usually buy mine in packs of Fat Quarters, these ones I found in Aldi:

You will also need some binding:

Once you have your fabrics, first you will need to iron them flat, get rid of any creases.  And then you will need to cut your fabric into 15cm wide strips – if you do this correctly you should get 3 strips from one fat quarter.  Here you can see I have a rotary cutter and a proper cutting mat – which makes things a lot easier, but it can still be done with scissors and a ruler.

The next step is to measure out your triangles – an easy way of doing this is to mark at 14cm intervals along the top of the fabric.

Along the bottom you need to mark in the same way, only start with the first mark at 7cm, then every 14cm along.

Now you just join the dots to form a zig zag pattern, and either use scissors to cut along your lines, or use a rotary cutter like me.

And now you will have your triangles, you should be able to make 9 complete triangles from one fat quarter.

Take two triangles in matching fabrics and place right sides together (i.e. prints facing each other). Pin in position.

I like to do all my triangles at once – it saves time in the long run, here is my pile of triangles ready to be sewn together.

Now it is best to use a sewing machine to stitch your triangles together, but if you have patience it can be done by hand.  The images below show how to sew your two pieces of fabric together – remember to leave the top unstitched for turning inside out later!

Basically sew down one side and back up the other (remembering to back stitch at the beginning and end to secure stitches in place).  This is what your sewn triangle should look like.

Snip the end off, being careful not to cut through the stitches!

Turn inside out and either use your scissors (closed!) or the end of a pencil to push out the trip of the triangle – this helps it to be more pointy.

Iron flat.

Do this for each triangle – I like to sew them all first, then snip them, then turn them all inside out, and then iron them all – it makes it quicker and an easier process, getting each stage out of the way in one go.

Here is my pile of ironed triangles!

Next I would recommend snipping off the rough edges at the top, to give your triangles a smooth top line – this will make it easier later when you are sewing them into the binding.

Here you can see the difference in the unsnipped and the snipped neater version.

Now you will need to select your binding – I used to use ribbon for this but found it too slippery and unpredictable on a sewing machine.  So I treated myself to some proper binding, which you can find on Amazon or online craft shops.

Lay out your triangles in the order you want and spaced as you would like them – I usually leave a gap of about 1cm between my triangles.  And then measure out how much binding you will need – leaving enough at either end for hanging loops

I like to fold my binding over at the ends to prevent any fraying.

Then you will need to fold over length ways and you can pin it, but I find it easier not to pin it, you can hold it in position as you put it through the machine.

Secure the end under the foot and start stitching along the edge until you reach the point where you want your first flag to be.

Then just insert your flag into the binding – making sure it is pushed right into the fold, then hold it tight as you sew over it with the machine.  As long as you are holding the binding and the bunting together – it should be a smooth, easy process.

When you are ready for the next flag, just pop it into the binding and keep on sewing (you can pause the sewing while you faff and get it straight – you don’t need to keep your foot on the pedal – that would be ludicrous!)

And just keep going, inserting the triangles as you go.

Once you have done the last flag – bring your beginning up to the sewing machine so you can see how long you need your end to be – I never calculate it properly in the beginning, so this is the easy way for me to ensure I have two lengths the same at each side!

Remember to fold over the very end to prevent fraying.  And now it is up to you whether you create a loop on each end for hanging – just by folding the ends over again to create a loop.

Once finished, you should have something like this.

Alternatively, you can buy this bunting here https://www.etsy.com/uk/shop/HookAndMarvellous?ref=search_shop_redirect

or you can purchase a do it yourself kit here

https://www.etsy.com/uk/listing/562187123/make-your-own-bunting-pack?ref=shop_home_active_1